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FAMILY LAW

Maintenance - Applying for a Benefit

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This topic is about applying for a Benefit.  

Make sure you look at all other topics which may assist you by looking at the related topics in the boxes at the top and bottom of this page  Just click on directly to any of them.

You should also look through our entire Master Index.

Make sure you look at our specialized topic as follows :

Benefit Fraud

 BENEFITS.

Just click on to the following link :

 

.  .  .  Benefits

 

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.  .  .  The full WINZ Booklet

 

We also provide you with a direct to the Website for WINZ which is the Government Department which deals with all kinds of benefits.

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.  .  .  WINZ full Website

 

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Feedback/Blogs/Reviews from related topic: Adoption Act 1955
"This topic delivered what it promised. Documents and ideas and some tips. I was happy. Miriam (Not rael name, but name supplied) Hamilton."
"I see that the documents posted on the Family Court of New Zealand now differ to the ones posted on your site, example form A4 consent to adoption -http://www.justice.govt.nz/courts/family-court/documents/forms/pdf/A4.pdf/view?searchterm=form%20a4
It asks for different information on the front page, e..g deponent and with or without notice, what does all this mean, and how do I complete this part of the form?
Do you have a sample of one of these forms completed?
Regards
Steve"

Feedback/Blogs/Reviews from related topic: Adoption Act 1955
"Can a woman aged 54 with a 16 year old child who is neither attending school or any other form of education/training continue to claim the DPB and child support indefinitely or should the child be on a separate independant benefit? and what if the child does not claim a benefit, does this justify the mothers ongoing DPB claim? - Jenny

Netlaw replies - Yes . . . . You go on to what is called a "Woman Alone" Benefit designed to allow the single parent to continue to be supported when the kids become independent. You need to discuss your circumstances with WINZ. The child may be entitled to an Independent Youth benefit, but they are not automatic. Special circumstances need to apply. Play around on the WINZ Website. Just type winz website into Google or your internet explorer.

Here is a quote from the WINZ Website. -

"To get a Domestic Purposes Benefit you'll need to be a sole parent, or a caregiver of someone sick or infirm, or a woman alone of 50 years of age or older. You must:

be a New Zealand citizen or permanent resident
have lived in New Zealand continuously for two years or more at any one time since becoming a New Zealand citizen or permanent resident (except refugees with permanent residence)
normally live in New Zealand".

Cheers . . . Netlaw



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Feedback/Blogs/Reviews from related topic: Adoption Act 1955
"Up to date. Great. the IRD Child Support site is so hard to follow. You need a computer degree. You tell it like it is. (One pissed off father)

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"Bloody fantastic coverage. Easy to understand and work out. Mike R - Auckland Central"
"Please advise - My partner pays his ex-wife child support every week. (The amount was agreed via a settlement agreement nutted out between lawyers at mediation.) Is this child support still payable on weeks when we have the children? (in school holidays we have the children for half of the time). It seems unfair for his ex-wife to be getting paid child support when we are supporting the children.
Netlaw replies - The access you enjoy in the holidays must be averaged out over the whole year. It does not apply on a weekly basis. That sounds unfair but that is the way it has been interpreted. "

Feedback/Blogs/Reviews from related topic: Adoption Act 1955
"Hi, what is the success of wives asking for spousal support today? is it a common application or is it becoming too rare because there is DPB available and also because the system is changing and not favoring this type of maintenance anymore?? I just like to have a rough idea if I should pursue this. I've recently been made redundant, am getting no child maintenance and my ex says that I wont be able to get anything anyway as his business is off shore...Any help will be great thanks.

Netlaw replies: It is not common because the DPB is well above what most partners could afford, and still maintain themselves. But in financially well off families spousal maintenance is a runner, particularly until a matrimonial property division provides the partner in need with a large lump sum. Then, the need for extra maintenance dissipates. Apply for a benefit immediately and then apply also to the Family Court for an order for spousal maintenance. If the orders you receive amount to LESS than the DPB then that money goes towards the benefit, not on top. But if your order is MORE than the benefit then you just go off the benefit and take the sum awarded."

Feedback/Blogs/Reviews from related topic: Adoption Act 1955
"Great to see all the relevant Acts laid out with direct reference to your own topics - Christie - Thames"
Feedback/Blogs/Reviews from related topic: Adoption Act 1955
"I did my own documents and got before a Judge and got my own order for protection. I reckon I did it faster then my lawyer last time I need such an order two years ago.
Thank you . . . . Sandie (not my real name)
"

"Good helpful information and tips on all of your family law topics topics. Keep it coming Netlaw. Judi - Invercargill"
Feedback/Blogs/Reviews from related topic: Adoption Act 1955
"While you have considerable detailed information for the applicant there is no information directed at a respondent and how to respond.
Netlaw responds: Sorry. We will add to the topic today. The Respondent must, within 20 working days, file in the Court and serve on the Applicant, his or her own Affidavit of Assets and Liabilities as well as a Narrative Affidavit."

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