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Mental Health

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This website sets out everything you need to know about Mental Health and Compulsory Assessment and Treatment.

We will give you direct access to the procedure, the full relevant Acts of Parliament and a full overview of how the system works.

For Mental Health issues which relate to the Criminal Court you should visit our topic: Criminal Procedure (Mentally Impaired Persons) Act 2003

For Health issues which relate to the disabilities you should visit the following topic: Intellectual Disability (Compulsory Care and Rehabilitation) Act 2003

If you wish to know anything about Insanity as a defence to criminal proceedings then you will need to click on to this separate topic in the Index where the concept of insanity will be discussed under that heading.

Insanity as a Defence

The purpose of this Index site is to provide you with details of the law and the procedures under the Mental Health (Compulsory Assessment & Treatment) Act 1992.

CLICK ON below to get direct access to the Act and its Amendment : 

We provide you with a direct link . . . .



We now provide you with a direct link to ALL the Government legislation site where you can look up Acts of Parliament and Regulations and Rules. An Act is also known as a Statute. A Regulation is also sometimes known as a Rule. This Government legislation site is still going through some teething problems. But you will be able to access all legislation and find specific Acts and Rules and individual sections.

Statutes.....The first part of this topic has been displayed free of charge. Join up for $45 to have access to this and all other topics!

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"Hi to Netlaw. I found this a useful overview. I went to the ACC website and found it too difficult to follow. Jim (Dunedin)


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"I am a retired Solicitor from Kent in England and the $45 I spent on your site was really helpful because I am intending settling in New Zealand and your "one stop shop" was a real boon to me. Thanks again. Arnold T. Devon, England"
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"I was looking round Google to find something about representing myself and I found this and a number of your topics SPOT ON. Thanks. This one was great! Jon F. Auckland - May 2007"
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"The best topic I have seen so far. Everything I needed. My lawyer said I needed to pay in $2000 to get the thing started. I did it myself. It took some effort but I got there. He did not defend it and now, thanks to Netlaw and the Court staff, I have my Order from the Court in my hand. Money well spent (Identity withheld) Auckland - June 2007"
"Excellent documents and access to the precise law.The Court staff were helpful. Gayle. Coromandel."
"Really useful. One letter (and some draft documents) from me did the trick. I did not need to go near a lawyer. The "other" person was my partner's "ex" and she followed me to work almost every day threatening me but not in a criminal way The Police said she had not committed a crime. My letter worked. She has not done it since but my response looked really professional. Thanks - Barbara - Tauranga "
Feedback/Blogs/Reviews from related topic: ACC
"I'm making an enquiry on behalf of a relative who is paying child support for a person who is in his mid 30s now, the inland revenue who he is making these payments to told me it is not child support it is spouse support payments and he needs to go back to court to have the order changed. Who do we call now as he is not on a good income and should qualify for legal aid.

Netlaw replies: Yes, Spousal Maintenance is different from Child Support. The Family Court deals with Spousal maintenance but the IRD (Child Support Division) deals with kid's maintenance. Choose any family court lawyer and if he earns less than about $33,000 he should get legal aid."

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"I was roughly treated at a Police interview. One cop did hit me. It was not that hard but he banged me on the top of the head and yelled that he wanted the truth. It does happen . . not as bad as you see on TV but it does happen. Kevin - North Shore"
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"Helpful, but can you give us some more caselaw? I like the rest of your topics. Barry - North Shore"
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"Helpful . . . Muriel"
"Gosh these Trust documents are so long. There should be shorter documents. but I suppose they are necessary. But good of you to include so many docments in your site. We have been helped by your wills sites too. John Mc."
"Bloody Hell! You provide us with the documentation as well! This is great stuff. I will still use a lawyer but I now have enough information to make some informed decisions myself.
Kevin M - Hamilton"

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"My husband and I liked all this information. Keep it up please! Well worth the $45. We have spent so much on lawyers, blast them. I suppose they are necessary but when we see these concepts set out simply by you in Netlaw we wonder what all the secrecy and fuss was about in other matters. "
"I have heard that through the Will I am able to gift up to $27 500.00 of my property per year to some one that I want to inherit without paying gifting fees where do I find a template for this

Netlaw answers: Good morning,

You posted a blog on Netlaw this morning. We reply as follows.

Gift duty is not payable on money or assets which pass under your will. Therefore, you can leave $1,000,000 to someone in your will and it is not classified as a gift.
However, if you wanted to give someone $1 million during your lifetime then that would attract gift duty at 40 cents in the dollar (subject to a more specific calculation about a lesser amount of gift duty in some bands above $27,000) for any amount gifted over $27,000 per year. This is why gift programmes over a number of years have to be set up during the course of your lifetime to avoid or minimise paying gift duty.
But we repeat - money or assets left under a will are not treated as gifts for gift duty purposes. Nor are death duties payable any more. They were abolished well over 10 years ago.

Cheers . . . . Netlaw"

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